Dealing with workplace harassment, bullying and discrimination to create a respectful workplace

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Expires February 23rd

  20 Training videos

 (19 minutes, 19 seconds)

Sexual harassment is still alive and unwell in many Canadian workplaces.  Stephen will help your employees and managers understand what is and is not sexual harassment, how to prevent it and what to do if it’s taking place.

#1 - Sexual harassment

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#2 - All inappropriate workplace behaviours

16:59 - This video addresses all kinds of inappropriate workplace behaviours you may find in a Canadian workplace.  Stephen discusses issues such as human rights harassment, discrimination and just plain bullying.  Employees and supervisors will have a better idea of these definitions and some examples.  And then Stephen discusses ways to avoid workplace problems and what each person must do to address them if they arise.  It’s a good introduction about these issues and then you can fill in the details of your workplace and your policies.

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#3 - Supervisors dealing with inappropriate workplace behaviours

12:52 - In this video, Stephen speaks directly to your supervisors and managers.  He spells out three techniques when employees say they are being harassed, bullied or treated inappropriately.  It will be most useful that your supervisors and managers at least view the other video about inappropriate workplace behaviours prior to viewing this video.  In this video, Stephen will take your supervisors/managers through the Initial Approach, the Informal Approach and the Formal Approach, spelling out the best approach for their situations.  This recording is not meant to educate people about investigation techniques, as the desire is to do the proper job before it gets into anything formal and/or legal.

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#4 - Workplace orientation

17:29 - Stephen speaks directly to your new employees and supervisors, about various forms of inappropriate behaviours, including sexual harassment, all forms of human rights harassment & bullying.  He explains what is and isn’t appropriate and what to do if something goes wrong.  You can then fill in more specific details about your policies and procedures.

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#5 - Workplace orientation - 6 to 12 months on the job

16:26 - Use this video to follow up on Stephen’s Orientation video when your employees first joined your workplace.  You are encouraged to show this video to your new-ish employees about 6 to 12 months after they started.  Stephen reviews the various forms of inappropriate behaviours, including sexual harassment, all forms of human rights harassment & bullying.  Because new employees are often overwhelmed with information when they first start, it doesn’t hurt to remind them of these issues.

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#6 - Human rights vs. letting a probationary employee go

13:39 - This Canadian human rights case deals with a probationary employee who wanted the owner to do too much, too quickly to deal with an issue she felt was sexual harassment. Employers usually just think they can say “not working out” when an employee is on probation but does human rights trump an employer’s rights?

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#7 - When workplace "sexual" pranks go too far

10:58 - This Canadian court case deals with an incident involving g-string panties being given to some women at work.  While this workplace wanted to take a strong stand on sexual harassment, did they go too far with their punishment?  Employers have to strike a balance of rights and consider their actions when things go wrong

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#8 - When comments about weight are brought into human rights

9:07 - This Canadian human rights case deals with inappropriate comments being made about the weight of some women at work.  But since weight and appearance aren’t protected grounds under human rights, might this be the wrong place to make your sexual harassment complaint?  How far does sexual harassment go anyway?

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#9 - When an employee is labelled a "troublemaker"

11:06 - This Canadian human rights case has a fired employee not just looking for a financial award, but also her job back.  The employer thought this employee just kept making trouble, while she thought she was just addressing legitimate concerns, especially around the way she and other women were treated.  Who’s right?

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#10 - The poisoned workplace

10:33 - This Canadian human rights decision involves inappropriate jokes, nicknames and other behaviours that can often take place in some workplaces, especially male-dominated workplaces.  Many times people will use the defence that if everyone has to take these kinds of jokes, then how can it be discrimination or bad?  If you have a male-dominated workplace where anything similar goes on, this case might be helpful to get the discussion going about what’s acceptable and what’s not.

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#11 - When the bully is the manager

12:36 - This Canadian civil law suit takes us through a judge and jury award against one of the world’s largest companies, and the appeal to Ontario’s top court.  When an employee has to quit because of outrageous bullying by her boss, she often doesn’t have a lot of options.  Going to court is a lengthy and expensive process, so this case illustrates the importance of dealing with a bully boss, especially one that exhibited such obviously bad behaviour.  Most policies cover issues of bullying but the policies are only as good as they are administered…something clearly lacking in this case.  It’s a good example to lead by example to eliminate workplace bullying.

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#12 - Discipline due to social media postings

11:49 - Stephen lets your employees and supervisors learn from the mistakes of others. This Canadian labour arbitration case deals with social media postings that can go very wrong.  Everyone will be educated about the need to be careful and considerate about what they “say” outside work.

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#13 - Social media misconduct harming an employer's reputation

12:57 - This Canadian labour arbitration case deals with inappropriate tweets sent out from a Toronto fire fighter and picked up by a national newspaper.  When the employer takes the tough action of firing an employee and the union thinks it goes too far, an arbitrator has to decide the harm to the employer’s reputation.  Misconduct via social media is a big concern for employers.

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#14 - Discipline due to social media postings

9:31 - This Canadian labour arbitration is another example of employees getting in trouble for social media postings.  In this case, there was no obvious indication where the employee worked, yet the employer felt the potential harm to their reputation was too great.  This case is another example where everyone should be educated about the need to be careful and considerate with what they “say” outside work.

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#15 - Accommodating a pregnant employee at work

7:13 - This Canadian human rights case deals with a woman being told she must start her maternity leave early.  Perhaps a bar isn’t a great place for a woman to work, with all the lifting and strains of the job.  Where does pregnancy fit into human rights legislation and how much is an employer expected to accommodate the expectant mother?

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#16 - Workplace violence

12:43 - This Canadian court case deals with an incident of workplace violence.  Is every incident of violence the same and are employers expected to deal with each situation in the same way?  Employers are expected to address workplace violence, therefore it’s important to know what’s expected.

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#17 - When violence happens outside work

10:52 - This Canadian labour arbitration involves off-duty misconduct that includes violent behaviour.  Many times employees and employers believe what they do on their own time will not impact their workplace.  In this case there were very few witnesses, therefore making it harder to know exactly what went on.  However, even on a balance of probabilities, employers can take action when they think the welfare of their workforce is at stake.

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#18 - Will quick action save a company from liability?

12:44 - This Canadian human rights case deals with a sexual harassment complaint from a two year employee.  The owner took quick action when he first heard about the complaint, but does that absolve him of liability?  Will an employer always be liable for the actions of their employees and managers?

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#19 - When a harassment complaint goes very wrong

11:07 - This Canadian court case deals with a harassment complaint that went very wrong.  This case is especially useful for workplace supervisors and managers to understand the delicate balancing act they must perform in protecting the rights of all employees.  If employers don’t do enough, they could be in legal hot water.  If they do too much, they can be in the same legal hot water.  Common sense will help, but being unbiased and giving people a chance will help even more.

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#20 - When a workplace apology works wonders

10:21 - This Canadian human rights case deals with people making glaring mistakes and the best approaches to correct them.  Everyone makes mistakes, but even when someone’s workplace human rights are violated, there still must be a way to make amends.

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More Tools to Fix Your Workplace

© STEPHEN HAMMOND - HARASSMENT SOLUTIONS INC.   
 
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Training videos

More Tools to
Fix Your Workplace

© STEPHEN HAMMOND  |  HARASSMENT SOLUTIONS INC.

 CONTACT