Dealing with workplace harassment, bullying and discrimination to create a respectful workplace

Training videos for ALL Canadian Workplaces

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Training Package #5  - Managing your respectful workplace - 20 videos

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Videos included in this package

  1. Sexual harassment at work
  2. All inappropriate workplace behaviours
  3. Supervisors dealing with inappropriate workplace behaviours
  4. Workplace orientation
  5. Workplace orientation 6 to 12 months on the job time
  6. Human rights vs. letting a probationary employee go
  7. When workplace “sexual” pranks go too far
  8. When comments about weight are brought into human rights
  9. When an employee is labelled a “troublemaker”
  10. The poisoned workplace
  11. When the bully is the manager -
  12. Discipline due to social media postings
  13. Social media misconduct harming an employer’s reputation
  14. Discipline due to social media postings
  15. Accommodating a pregnant employee at work
  16. Workplace violence
  17. When violence happens outside work
  18. Will quick action save a company from liability?
  19. When a harassment complaint goes very wrong
  20. When a workplace apology works wonders

This bundle of 20 videos gives you everything we’ve got of this series.  It includes our five stand-alone educational recordings and then our 15 real Canadian legal cases where your employees, supervisors, and managers (let’s call them all supervisors) get to learn from the mistakes of others.  People like cases and while fictitious “case studies” are interesting, there’s nothing like the real thing, where people get a clearer understanding of what is expected by law, coming from the decision of a judge, adjudicator or arbitrator.

 

The first five videos educate your employees and managers about a wide variety of workplace behaviours, such as harassment, sexual harassment, bullying and discrimination.  When an employee first begins at your workplace, you can show them the “Workplace orientation” video and then add your own specific policies and procedures.  Keep track of these employees so that in 6 to 12 months you can show them the follow up “Workplace orientation 6 to 12 months on the job” video.  Employees at all levels get a lot of information at the very beginning, so reinforcement is not just a good idea, but it helps with adult education and our need for repetition and reminders.

 

The specific videos of “Sexual harassment at work,” “All inappropriate workplace behaviours” and “Supervisors dealing with inappropriate workplace behaviours” can be added to each employee’s education, being proactive.  Or you can show these videos after you think there is a need, due to an incident, or when you realize some education has been lacking.

 

Either on their own, or as an addition to one of the other videos noted above, you can show one of the case videos.  Just as judges, adjudicators and arbitrators use cases from all across Canada, these cases come from various places.  Therefore, unless you need something particularly unique for your Canadian jurisdiction, all of these cases should work for your learning objectives.  These cases include:

 

#6.  Human rights vs. letting a probationary employee go.  This human rights case from Manitoba addresses the conflicting issues of the rights of an employer during the crucial probationary period and the rights of an employee regarding a human rights issue.  Most employers think they can do anything they want during the probationary period, and while not completely accurate, there is a lot of leeway as the boss tries to see if the new person is a “fit.”  However, human rights legislation, covering harassment and discrimination, is usually given preferential status compared to other laws.  This case encourages supervisors to ensure they don’t violate an employee’s human right…perhaps especially a new employee, since everyone wants to start off on the right foot.  If this is shown to all employees, they will appreciate that you take these issues seriously, including with new employees.  - 13:39

 

#7.  When workplace “sexual” pranks go too far.  This wrongful dismissal case from B.C. lets employees and supervisors know that when their workplace becomes too “sexualized” in what may seem light and humourous, it can lead to some employees taking things too far.  There are especially lessons for supervisors in this case, including the importance of listening to employees before you come to a decision what discipline you take.  Your supervisors don’t need to learn about investigations to appreciate the many things that went wrong by management.  All employees can learn that you can still have a fun workplace, but there are lines which shouldn’t be crossed…for fear of ending up in court.  - 10:58

 

#8.  When comments about weight are brought into human rights.  This human rights case from Ontario opens the eyes of many an employee and supervisor (even a human resources expert) because we often have this narrow picture of what constitutes sexual harassment in Canada.  This case alerts all employees that people need to be more sensitive to the comments they make and more vigilant to address issues before you end up in some time-consuming, costly and sometimes headline-grabbing legal process.  The fact that it’s an older case just bolsters the learning where you get to say “this is old law,” meaning this isn’t some recent case from a week ago, and it’s something everyone is expected to know about.  Yet most employees and supervisors would have no clue the law goes this far.  - 9:07

 

#9.  When an employee is labelled a “troublemaker.”  This human rights case from B.C. helps supervisors to stay away from labelling people.  Instead they will be encouraged to look at the performance of an employee through new lens each time an issue arises.  The unfortunate aspect of this case is how supervisors became entrenched in their views of this woman, when she was just bringing forward legitimate concerns of discrimination based on her gender.  This case isn’t just about gender/sex discrimination, it’s about taking as much bias out of our decision making as possible.  Your supervisors will be encouraged to form their own opinions of employees, instead of just taking the word of others…and then getting into big and expensive (this one very expensive) trouble.  - 11:06

 

#10.  The poisoned workplace.  This human rights case from B.C. applies to any workplace, but it’s especially effective in addressing certain behaviours found in many Canadian male-dominated workplaces.  Lots of Canadian workplaces feel they are rather exempt from normal laws because “everyone acts that way.”  It’s not really bullying or discrimination when everyone goes along with it, right?!?  This case even adds the element where the complainant isn’t exactly a saint in his dealings with others at work, yet it explains the power of Canadian human rights legislation and how employers can be exposed to expensive litigation.  But it’s the role of management that really gets attention.  If your workplace is in need of improvement, and you want your supervisors to lead the way, this may be the video to watch and discuss.  - 10:33

 

#11.  When the bully is the manager.  This wrongful dismissal case from Ontario is not only significant, but it got a lot of press at the time.  We don’t expect one of the largest companies in the world to get caught being so wrong and doing so much damage to an employee (who was a supervisor).  And don’t be fooled by the appeal court substantially reducing the financial penalties, because the end result was one of the highest awards from Canadian courts for this kind of inappropriate workplace behaviour (seems the original jury was thinking more of American decisions).  This case will help anyone in your management line to know that if caught, bullies can cost a workplace a fortune…not just in money, but in time lost dealing with the lawyers and everyone else.  - 12:36

 

#12.  Discipline due to social media postings.  This labour arbitration case from Ontario has the important message of being careful what you post on social media, but for supervisors, it has another message…even more important.  This employer wanted to be firm with postings from three employees and the end result seems rather logical for two of them.  But for the third one – who this case was about – it came down to the previous inappropriate actions of one of their managers.  The employee ended up with a very severe form of discipline, but not as severe as the company wanted, due to the manager’s previous behaviour.  The message comes through loud and clear:  if you want to hold employees to a high standard, your supervisors better be exhibiting that same high standard.  - 11:49

 

#13.  Social media misconduct harming an employer’s reputation.  This labour arbitration case from Ontario started with front page headlines in the National Post newspaper.  We are living in a world of instant on-line postings where some employees don’t pay attention to the “sober second thoughts” of the consequences of their actions.  If you have a policy regarding off-duty conduct and it includes social media behaviour, this case will be a good reminder of what is expected.  If you don’t yet have such a policy, don’t wait until you do:  Show this and explain how you will be coming up with something shortly and ensure people understand they are responsible for their “outside” actions if they harm others in your workplace or your workplace reputation.  Social media is expanding, not contracting, so you want all employees to know they can’t just say or write anything, put it on the internet, and there be no consequences.  - 12:57

 

#14.  Discipline due to social media postings.  This Canadian labour arbitration case from the north has the important message of being careful what you post on social media…even if you don’t mention your employer.  This is one of many cases where online postings are getting people into hot water.  The arbitrator felt the discipline or termination was too severe and noted they didn’t treat everyone equally in their discipline, YET, he still upheld the termination.  The fired employee didn’t mention his employer by name and none of the misconduct was done while at work, but because the internet allows people to track others easily, the reputation of the company could be affected.  And because the company had well-established policies and values, they were able to note how this one posting went squarely against their values.  - 9:31

 

#15.  Accommodating a pregnant employee at work.  This human rights case from Alberta deals with a very common form of discrimination and litigation in Canada:  pregnancy.  With so many Canadian women being denied employment opportunities because they are pregnant, or they could possibly become pregnant, supervisors need to be doing the right thing, or take a chance their workplace could wind up in litigation.  Supervisors should know what they can and can’t do when it comes to possible discrimination against women due to pregnancy, possible pregnancy or raising children.  This case gets them thinking about simple ways they can accommodate a pregnant woman when modifications may be necessary for the health of her and her child to come.  But this case is also worthwhile for employees at all levels to know that your workplace will celebrate women and men who want to work and have children.  - 7:13

 

#16. Workplace violence. This wrongful dismissal case from Manitoba delves into an incident perceived to be workplace violence, but the judge came to another conclusion.  While every Canadian jurisdiction outlaws some form of workplace violence, some require more vigilance, policies and education.  This case does a good job of setting out what is and is not workplace violence.  Even a physical altercation, such as in this workplace, can have different angles to it.  And when the employer has different motives, this can end him up in hot water…and a lot of financial costs.  This case is especially good for supervisors to get a better grip on what they have to do before things go too far.  - 12:43

 

#17. When violence happens outside work.  This Manitoba labour arbitration case deals with a very different off-duty conduct: violent behaviour.  Many times people feel they can get away with a wide-variety of behaviours as long as they do it on their own time.  Often that’s true, but not always.  Your learning objective may include workplace violence, or it could just be off-duty conduct, or both.  This case is also a bit different because it involves two women, when we often attribute this kind of behaviour to men.  As well, this case adds the element of how much evidence do you have to bring forward to take decisive action.  It’s not an episode of Law and Order, but because so many people get their understanding of the law from TV programs, it will help them understand these issues can be real and consequences can be great.  - 10:52

 

#18.  Will quick action save a company from liability?  This human rights case from New Brunswick helps supervisors know exactly how careful they have to be when dealing with sexual harassment or any form of human rights harassment or discrimination.  This employer was given high praise for the actions he took, so it may come as a surprise why the company ended up being liable at all.  There’s a principle from the Supreme Court of Canada that “management is ultimately responsible” for the actions of their employees.  This case is a perfect example of how that is true and how serious the courts and tribunals are about upholding this principle.  It’s likely a great case to have your supervisors and managers being more proactive, so they don’t get caught being reactive, and in the process perhaps miss something.  - 12:44

 

#19.  When a harassment complaint goes very wrong.  This wrongful dismissal case from B.C. illustrates that if someone is determined to find someone “guilty” it may lead to many unfortunate results.  The investigator in this workplace seemed to be more interested in looking after an employee who made a complaint, than looking after the interests of fairness and balance.  Looking at this case, your supervisors will learn that the rights of every employee (including supervisors and managers) must be respected.  The learning is not about investigation techniques.  Many workplaces are so afraid of a formal complaint and so afraid they haven’t done “enough” that they will forget about other aspects of fairness.  Sure, take all complaints seriously, but complaints are just complaints until they are proven.  In the meantime, if there’s a few small problems, give the employee a chance to improve, instead of firing someone.  Lots to learn about fairness with this case.  - 11:07

 

#20.  When a workplace apology works wonders.  This B.C. human rights case is a great one to teach supervisors and managers, however, the message is just as important to non-supervisory employees.  Since you don’t want employees at any level to be afraid of making any mistakes, this case lets us know that when we screw up, we can do our best to make things right.  This case won’t condone inappropriate jokes, but it will allow people to realize they can learn from their mistakes…and move on.  The notion of “reasonableness” is important in Canadian workplace human rights legislation and this case really sets out what is reasonable and what is not.  - 10:21

 

For each of these videos, Stephen has prepared “Lesson suggestions,” helping you with ideas and even questions to help you deliver stress-free in-house training.  You don’t have to re-invent the wheel, but you are strongly encouraged to add the important elements of your workplace policies, procedures and most of all, culture.  All your employees, staff and supervisors, will appreciate the added education.

 

You can SUBSCRIBE to this Video Package for 3 different time periods - 1 month - 3 months - or 1 year.

Please CONTACT us for payment of your subscription and you will be provided with a web page link.

The videos can be shown on a computer, linked from a computer to a TV or to a digital projector.

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© STEPHEN HAMMOND - HARASSMENT SOLUTIONS INC.   
 
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Training videos for ALL Canadian Workplaces

Training Package #5  - Managing your respectful workplace - 20 videos

You can SUBSCRIBE to this Video Package
for 3 different time periods
1 month - 3 months - or 1 year.

 

Please CONTACT us for payment of your subscription and you will be provided with a web page link.

The videos can be shown on a computer, linked from a computer to a TV or to a digital projector.

© STEPHEN HAMMOND  |  HARASSMENT SOLUTIONS INC.

 CONTACT