Here's a FREE selection of articles that address many different problems and situations in your workplace.

ARTICLES

#38

WHEN A SUPERVISOR BULLIES BECAUSE HE’S BEEN TAUGHT IT’S THE MOST EFFECTIVE WAY

 

Some workplaces have extensive supervisory skills programs where people are taught effective and respectful ways to manage their workforce. Many do not, or the new supervisor is put into her position and the training comes months later…or sporadically. Just because people are technically good at their job doesn’t mean they are good at managing people. Some people, not knowing any better, have learned from other bosses, supervisory skills that would be nothing short of bullying. We would think that any sane, reasonable person would know that bullying employees is not the way to go, however, that’s not always the case. And the bullying boss isn’t automatically a bully by nature (maybe they are, maybe they’re not). But people can learn and it might surprise us to find out how quickly people can learn to be better – and effective – at managing people, without being anywhere near a bully.

 

TRY THIS:

 

Even if there’s no time for a formal training process - or it’s coming later – it doesn’t have to take a lot of time to help a new supervisor with some basics about supervising employees. If you’ve observed some inappropriate behaviour, these would be good to bring up at the first meeting. But you can also just start by laying out perhaps five principles when it comes to managing people. And if you do a good job, you don’t need to go to a text book – you can come up with these principles from what you know to be true.

 

HOW ABOUT:

 

“I’m sorry we haven’t had time to help you with your supervisory skills. You got this job for a number of reasons and so I’d like to help you with some effective ways to supervise employees. These are 5 principles I have learned to deal with people fairly and effectively. First, treat people the way you want to be treated. It might sound trite, but if you ask yourself, “would I want someone speaking to me that way?” it puts things into perspective quickly. Second, don’t lash out at someone, even if you want to. If something has gone wrong, try to be calm so you can discuss it properly. When you get angry at someone, their back will usually go up and they won’t hear a lot. Third, when giving instructions, ask the person to explain back to you what you said to them. Even between two people, in simple conversations, things can get mixed up. You’ll either get to say, “great” or you get to correct or explain things more clearly. Fourth, if there’s a dispute, get all the facts before coming to a conclusion. I’m not talking about a CSI investigation. You might just need to ask one other person one question…or there can be a bit more. Fifth, don’t assume someone’s lying because they tell you a different truth from what you know. Find out where the person is coming from and half the time – or more – you’ll see that there has been a misunderstanding that can easily be corrected. These are just a few points I want to make, and with them, let’s talk about some things I’ve observed and how I can help you be more effective as a supervisor…”

 

 

Stephen Hammond, B.A., LL.B., CSP

 

If you have any questions, please contact Stephen.

Dealing with workplace harassment, bullying and discrimination to create a respectful workplace

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© STEPHEN HAMMOND - HARASSMENT SOLUTIONS INC.    
 
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Here's a FREE selection of articles that address many different problems and situations in your workplace.

Here's a FREE selection of articles that address many different problems and situations in your workplace.

© STEPHEN HAMMOND HARASSMENT SOLUTIONS INC.
 
  
 
CONTACT